Boat and Trailer

Replacing an Outboard Jet Water Pump

Recently my outboard jet motor would start to overheat at wide open throttle.  Installing a new water pump fixed that issue.

The process is fairly simple, but while there are lot of materials online about doing this for prop outboards, I found very little for jet outboards.

So here is the basics of how to replace the water pump.

This guide is meant to be a general overview, rather than detailed instructions.  Also keep in mind I’m not a trained mechanic.  So follow this information at your own risk.

If you attempt to replace the pump on your outboard jet, then I recommend not only reading this page, but watching the YouTube videos about prop water pumps.  Much of the information is the same.

I also recommend getting the model number (well.. letters) off your lower unit and getting the schematic from Outboard Jets web page.  This will help you see the various connections.

The pump is located at top of the lower unit.  So the first thing you need to do is remove the lower unit.

This is done by first removing the shoe, which on my unit is held on by 6 nuts.  Here is a picture showing the top 3.

Outboard Jet Grate

Next remove the impeller, by folding down the flaps around the big nut and then unscrewing the big nut.

New Outboard Jet Impeller Installed

On my unit there are 5 bolts holding the lower unit to the middle unit.  4 are inside the lower unit, going up.  The fifth is on the outside and goes down.

In this picture you can see that fifth bolt going down.  Remove that.  Also undo the connections holding the shift cable to the bucket and lower unit.

Top of Outboard Jet Lower Unit

Next we remove the 4 last bolts holding the lower unit on.  Below is a picture of my unit.  The 4 bolts close to the shaft hold the bearing case together.  The next set of 4 are what hold the lower unit on.

Inside a Outboard Jet Lower Unit

The lower unit should then slide on out.

Sorry, but I forgot to take a before picture.  But where that black paint is around the drive shaft is where the pump was attached.  Undo the 4 bolts holding the pump on, and remove the pump.

Replacing Outboatd Jet Water Pump - Part 5

Here is a picture of the pump plat and spacer.  You’ll notice they have pieces of the old gasket stuck on it.

Replacing Outboatd Jet Water Pump - Part 2

Using a wire brush, remove any pieces of gasket and debris from the spacer and lower unit.

Replacing Outboatd Jet Water Pump - Part 3

The result should be nice and shiny for a tight fit when you put it back together.

Replacing Outboatd Jet Water Pump - Part 4

The water pump replacement kit has not only a new impeller, but new plate and gaskets.

Replacing Outboatd Jet Water Pump - Part 1

Using the new pieces start to reassemble the unit.  A little marine grease around the gasket edges can help make a good seal.

Replacing Outboatd Jet Water Pump - Part 6

Make sure the inside of the pump housing is nice and clean.  It should be free from sharp edges as well.

Add a little bit of dish soap to provide some initial lubrication for the impeller.  Push the new impeller in – rotating it counter clockwise.

Replacing Outboatd Jet Water Pump - Part 7

The 4 bolts holding the pump on were a little corroded, so I cleaned them up before re-attaching.  Adding a little marine anti-seize or grease can help them from getting corrupted again.

Replacing Outboatd Jet Water Pump - Part 8

Lastly slide down the new top gasket.

Replacing Outboatd Jet Water Pump - Part 9

The lower unit then goes back on.  Just reverse what you did to take it off.

There are a few details I left out – so make sure to have a complete set of steps from a prop outboard to get what I missed.

For more information on boats and maintainance, please check out the boat page.

 

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2 thoughts on “Replacing an Outboard Jet Water Pump

  1. God bless you sir!I finally found a very informative guide to my removal and installation of my water pump on my 60/40 jet.Thanks to you I feel more comfortable doing the job because there’s no more fear of the unknown.Specialty manufacturing used threadlocker on basically all the bolts of my lower unit.I had to use heat and be very careful and patient to loosen them up without snapping them due to galvanic corrosion and the threadlocker.By not using threadlocker and greasing threads do you think they could possibly loosen up over time?

    1. IMO all you need is some anti seize and then snug the bolts down tight. A little locktite is ok for extra security – shouldn’t need much (sounds like the shop over did it last time).

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